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Cannes jury reveals the impossible truth about winning a lion.

Many people come to Cannes for the superstar keynote speakers. Sarah Jessica Parker and Kanye West made appearances this year while, crushingly, Aaron Sorkin cancelled at the last minute. Quite a few come to drink pink wine and trade gossip. And then there is a dedicated contingent who come for the awards, which is the reason Cannes exists in the first place.

This year, the organisers have provided a real treat specifically for people interested in trophies: a series of talks called “Jury Insights”.  Each day, the jury from the previous night’s ceremony open up and talk about how they chose the work they did and (crucially) why some very, very good work that teams spent months working very, very hard to bring to life, simply didn’t make the cut.

First cab off the awards rank was the Promo and Activation Jury, who revealed probably more than they should have about the grueling (at 3200 entries this year, you better believe it was grueling), task of sorting the storytelling wheat from the in-store sampling chaff.

Here’s their advice on the all-important case study video:

  • You’ve got 30, maybe 40 seconds to capture interest or you’re out.
  • Put the insight and idea in the first half, demonstrate craft and results in the second (or you’re out)
  • Don’t let your VO say: “And it worked!” (or you’re out)
  • Don’t let your VO say:  “Our brilliantly creative idea was…” (or you’re out) That’s for the jury to decide, not you.
  • Spend more time refining the clarity of the case study narrative before you worry about making it pretty.
  • But then spend plenty of time making it pretty (or you’re out)

The other thing that emerged from the session was the feeling that the thing that is really being judged are the judges themselves. They talked a lot about the scrutiny they felt their choices were under and even talked about the task as one of ‘curation’.

Judging the judges

The results for one category tend to get looked at as a whole and, because people are so interested in trends and patterns (shortcuts to meaning). As a result, the make-up of the group of awards can tend to skew individual decisions. If there are too many gongs going to tech-led ideas, for example, the judges felt it was important to balance it out with some decidedly analogue executions. Similarly with the mix of charity clients to big, corporate brands. And regions (can’t have too much from Brazil, for example). Not to mention holding companies or individual agency networks. And if your idea is an absolute screamer but happens to be very similar to another, completely unrelated piece of work from somewhere else on the globe (happens more than we care to admit), then both pieces cancel each other out and neither of you get a shiny statue.

BA, Cannes, Grand PrixFor the agencies and creatives that expend sweat and cash to enter, this information is fascinating, but ultimately of no use. It’s tempting to try to plot a contrarian approach (make your work deliberately analogue, for example), to improve your chances of standing out, but you can’t possibly know in advance if the top-flight entries in a category are heavy on digital or analogue.

A Cannes Lion has always been a hard thing to win. With the scrutiny of the jury and the swelling number of entries every year, it’s not going to get any easier. Except if you’re the genii behind something as jaw-droppingly good as the #lookup work for British Airways. Six lions and a Grand Prix for the team at Ogilvy London, led on the suit side by a good mate of mine, Chris Slough, shows that it’s not impossible, just really, really hard.

 

Barrie Seppings covered the CannesLions Festival of Creativity for Ogilvydo.com where you can catch all of the #OgilvyCannes coverage

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About the Author: Barrie Seppings blogs about making things better – for clients, brands, agencies and humans. He is currently Regional Creative Director at Ogilvy Singapore and he likes boards surf, skate and snow. Follow him on the Twitter, connect on LinkedIn, or add him on Google+

 

We’re more than halfway through the week at the #CanessLions advertising festival of creativity and we’ve been reporting the hell out of the place for #OgilvyCannes.  Here’s some of the coverage from the first few days:

Why are we reverse-engineering the creative process?

Simon Wylie, CEO, Contagious Communications speaks to the diffusion of categories at Cannes Lions, the blurring of agency competencies and how technology is forcing us to reverse engineer the creative process.

The revolution will definitely be (sort of) televised.

Eddy Moretti, CCO of Vice Magazine tells us how one online video kick-started Vice’s evolution from magazine publisher to $1.4 billion media empire.

Michael Lebowitz doesn’t want to kill creative people

The founder of Big Spaceship just wants to kill the structures they operate within.

 

 

 

It’s certainly my lucky year for festivals and conferences. In March I flew to Austin Texas for SXSW14, the world’s largest interactive and tech festival where I was deeply impressed by Chinese maker culture, the old rules for new media storytelling and, of course, Bruce Sterling’s closing keynote. In terms of inspiration and education, Southby is very hard to beat. Oh, and because tacos.

I filed stories and interviews every day from SXSW for Ogilvy’s own thought leadership program ogilvydo.com which is a brilliant example of in-house content marketing that takes advantage of a global network of really talented people while operating on the smell of an oily rag. They must have liked what I wrote, because they’ve asked me to be part of the team covering the world’s largest festival of creativity: Cannes Lions, in the south of France.

Winners, grinners & sinners.

Everyone who works in the biz knows of Cannes and the power of the (really quite ugly) trophies they hand out. But it has become much more than an awards show, with a full week of education sessions, keynotes, seminars and workshops to go along with, apparently, a staggering amount of drinking and handshaking.

Every year, the organisers bring a smattering of hollywood and entertainment types (we have the Hoff and SJP to look forward to this year), but personally, I’m looking forward to hearing from the likes of Jonathan Ives, Spike Jones and (my hero) Aaron Sorkin talk about how creativity works in their particular fields.

Advertising is still all about marketing.

I’m also planning on spending time with the big platforms and publishers – the googles, facebooks, twitters et al – who have really been ramping up their presence at Cannes and are now locked in a kind of beachfront creativity & hospitality deathmatch. Honestly, I can’t wait. The other interesting part for me will be taking our brand new Padcaster video rig for a spin – it’s a really clever piece of kit that turns a regular iPad into a super-portable ENG kit, allowing you to shoot, edit and publish directly on the iPad for near-instantaneous broadcasting. I love how it brings together a few pieces of pre-existing componentry to form a totally new machine.

For some of the most comprehensive coverage and insights, I really recommend ogilvydo.com and for a hilarious (and usually pretty accurate) forecast, you should check Ogilvy SA’s CCO Chris Gotz.