Archives For press kit

Using social listening and direct communications to profile individuals and identify opportunities.

This one is a bit tricky, but if you can execute it, your sales peeps will love you forever. Essentially, this exercise starts after an individual has registered and is an attempt to profile, segment and quantify their potential in some way so the selling conversation can start the moment they walk in the door. There are 2 ways to go about this: proactive and reactive.

Let’s talk about the second one first. Reactive profiling is just like stalking, only you can do it from the safety of your own desk, without the possibility of getting arrested. Take the information that an attendee has provided on their registration form and then add to it all the information you can find, freely and publicly available, on the internet. You may discover more about that person’s current role from their LinkedIn profile. You might learn which other competing events they have recently attended from their twitter account. Their opinions of brands and products (including yours) might be flowing freely in an online forum, or on the comments thread of a series of articles or reviews on a trade site.

Play detective, and you can learn a lot about someone’s experiences and opinions regarding your brand. Incidentally, this kind of work can still be given to the intern, provided they’re whip-smart and willing to learn.

b2b, events, social, profiling

It can be time-consuming, but you can create quite detailed individual profiles from publicly-accessible information.

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Proactive profiling has the same intent, except you ask the attendee in advance to share this information with you – probably at the point of registration. Some will, some won’t. But you can improve your strike rate by constructing a compelling value proposition for the individual – a benefit or an offer or an advantage that can only be accessed by sharing their social profiles.

Ultimately, the point of profiling is to analyse the data to do some scoring and segmentation, so you can identify your best prospects as they walk in the door (real or virtual) of your event. Work with your sales team to build a simple scoring mechanism – allocate points based on job title, previous roles, experience with competitors, opinions expressed and so on. Edit the info into easy-to-read one-sheeters and present a face-book (as its name suggests, it includes pictures) of top prospects back to the sales leads who will be working the event. This is probably the best example of the ‘digital lift’ you can give a live event, by taking intelligence gathered online and applying it to your (offline) live event.

This is the fifth instalment of the series: 10 ways to leverage digital for better B2B events. We recently ran an audit of the various tactics, strategies and recommendations we’ve developed @ Ogilvy for using digital to improve the live event experience (for the audience) and performance (for the marketer) – this advice is a summary of what we found to be true and useful.

< Previously in this series: #4 How to make shareable pre-event content    

> Up next in this series: #6 How to encourage referrals 

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About the Author: Barrie Seppings blogs about making things better – for clients, brands, agencies and humans. He is currently Regional Creative Director at Ogilvy Singapore and he likes boards surf, skate and snow. Follow him on the Twitter, connect on LinkedIn, or add him on Google+

About the images: all photographs used with the permission of Martin Ollman Photography. Contact Martin directly for rights and commissions.

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Generating and distributing pre-event promos and ‘warm-up’ content.

Okay, this is where you start to blur the line between what is content and what is promotion. Which can be fun, because you can start to think less like a marketer and more like a network television exec putting a big game to air. What previews and ‘sneak peeks’ can I release? Can I get some pre-game commentary? Some predictions? Can I do review of the season, or run a stats package on the main players?

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b2b, events, audience, social, content

Your audience is easily distracted – use ‘teaser’ content to build anticipation

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Events generally come together over time, so why not consider releasing details as they are confirmed – such as speakers, notable attendees, sponsors, partners and exhibitors. In classic Direct Marketing language, these all present opportunities to get in touch with your prospects with some ‘new news’, maintaining awareness and building relevance.

If you’ve already got some interest from your influencers, consider including them as talent, offering them a chance to give their views and opinions on the upcoming event.

Again, think bite-sized. A couple of lines. A 60-word summary. A provocative question. An image, or a small photo gallery. Lots of links. And a video or two if that’s within your means.

This is the fourth installment of the series: 10 ways to leverage digital for better B2B eventsWe recently ran an audit of the various tactics, strategies and recommendations we’ve developed @ Ogilvy for using digital to improve the live event experience (for the audience) and performance (for the marketer) – this advice is a summary of what we found to be true and useful.

< Previously in this series: #3 How to re-boot the EPK for ‘social’   

> Up next in this series: #5 How to profile & segment attendees 

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About the Author: Barrie Seppings blogs about making things better – for clients, brands, agencies and humans. He is currently Regional Creative Director at Ogilvy Singapore and he likes boards surf, skate and snow. Follow him on the Twitter, connect on LinkedIn, or add him on Google+

About the images: all photographs used with the permission of Martin Ollman Photography. Contact Martin directly for rights and commissions.

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Just like influencers and outreach, the Electronic Press Kit is a PR-based concept that needs to be tweaked a little for social media.

Where traditional Press Kits were designed to be published, the guiding principle for socially-adept Press Kits is ‘designed to be shared’. So think about how to break the information down into shareable chunks, suitable for popular social media platforms that your influencers may be using. Microblogging services such as Weibo and Twitter require, as their names suggest, micro pieces of content: sometimes as short as 140 characters. Vine and Instagram’s video service are built on clips as short as 6 seconds duration.

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b2b, events, digital, press kit

Whatever your content, format-wise it has to be ready to go.

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So think bite-sized. A couple of lines. A 60-word summary.
A provocative question. An image, or a small photo gallery. And links, lots of links.

Speaking of links, a useful addition to the Kit is a custom shortened URL that can mask and re-direct much longer URLs. Services like bit.ly and tinyURL not only condense and customise longer links, they also provide some fairly robust tracking and reporting, so you can see where your traffic is coming from and going to.

This is the third installment of the series: 10 ways to leverage digital for better B2B eventsWe recently ran an audit of the various tactics, strategies and recommendations we’ve developed @ Ogilvy for using digital to improve the live event experience (for the audience) and performance (for the marketer) – this advice is a summary of what we found to be true and useful.

< Previously in this series: #2 How to identify influencers & manage outreach         

> Up next in this series: #4: How to create shareable pre-event content  

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About the Author: Barrie Seppings blogs about making things better – for clients, brands, agencies and humans. He is currently Regional Creative Director at Ogilvy Singapore and he likes boards surf, skate and snow. Follow him on the Twitter, connect on LinkedIn, or add him on Google+

About the images: all photographs used with the permission of Martin Ollman Photography. Contact Martin directly for rights and commissions.

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